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How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

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The latest diabetes statistics1 point to an increase in diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes cases. According to some estimates, diabetes has increased by more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are pre-diabetic. What is hidden behind this smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely erectable.

Living with diabetes is a challenge for everyone, but children and adolescents often have special problems to settle. Young children may not understand why blood tests and medications are needed. They might be scared, angry, and not cooperate. Teens may feel different from their peers and want a more spontaneous lifestyle than diabetes allows them. Even when they follow their treatment plan faithfully, they may feel frustrated if the natural changes in puberty make their diabetes more difficult to control.

Type 2 diabetes occurs most often in adulthood, resulting in After 30 to 40 years of age. However, a growing number of adolescents and children are developing type 2 diabetes. Some groups of people are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes: You may have had diabetes of type 2 for many years without knowing it. Everyone has no symptoms. Symptoms may include: If you have any of the above symptoms, discuss it with your doctor.

This can happen even if the glucose level is not very high above the normal level. This can lead to some of the following complications often years after the start of diabetes: The type and severity of long-term complications vary from case to case. You can not develop it at all. In general, the more normal your glycaemia is, the less likely you are to develop complications. Your risk of developing complications is also reduced if you face other risk factors you may have, such as high blood pressure. Hypoglycaemia often called hypoglycaemia occurs when glucose levels become too low, usually below 4 mmol / L. People with diabetes who take insulin and / or some compresses against diabetes are at risk ofother complications.

A third of Americans may be developing type 2 diabetes in their own right, and most of them do not even know it. A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC shows that more than 84 million Americans, about one third of the population, have a pre-diabetes, aState marked by a blood sugar level higher than normal. Of this group, 90 percent are unaware that they have the disease.

In many cases, the levels of glycemia can be very high just when a person is consulting his doctor. CCommon symptoms include: Although there is no single cause of type 2 diabetes, there are well-known risk factors. Factors most likely to develop type 2 diabetes include: Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: You can assess your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. 2 by completing the Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test.

Over time, high blood sugar can lead to serious problems in the heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a history of diabetes or do not do diabetes. exercise. Having pre-diabetes also increases your risk. Pre-diabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not high enough to be called diabetes.

"The diagnosis of diabetes is based on your symptoms and the results of your diabetes analyzes. blood. See Clinical presentation aSymptoms - Before being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, most people have no symptoms and in those with symptoms, the most common are: Laboratory Tests - Multiple Blood Tests Random Blood Glucose Test - For a random blood glucose test, you can have blood drawn at any time of day, no matter the last time you have eaten.

Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic disorder that occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or when insulin does not work properly, so-called insulin resistance. . Insulin is the hormone that stimulates cells to absorb glucose from the blood to be used for energy. When this is the case, insulin does not teach glucose to the cells, which means that blood sugar levels increase so-called hyperglycemia.

Updated: 2018-03-20 — 1:45 pm
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