The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Blood Sugar Test Ogtt

What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, adolescents and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy for life. Diabetes type 2 is much more common.

Diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests that can be arranged by your doctor. If you are very sick, you should seek medical assistance immediately. If you have a blood relative with type 2 diabetes, you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes yourself. However, type 2 diabetes sometimes occurs in people who have diabetes. have no one in their family with the disease. In people with type 2 diabetes, glucose accumulates in the blood.

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body's use of glucose a type of sugar you make from carbohydrates that you eat. Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their job. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose to enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here's the problem: People with type 2 diabetes also known as diabetes mellitus can not use or store glucose properly, either because their cells are resistant, or, in some cases, are not enough.

You are more likely to develop hypoglycaemia if you also take other medications such as beta-blockers, drink too much alcohol, or do more physical activity than you should. usual. Hypoglycaemia can cause a feeling of weakness, sweating and confusion, and you can feel your heart beating hard. You can treat it immediately by eating glucose tablets or some sweets or a sweet drink. You may want to wear an emergency medical identification bracelet, or a similar jewel, so that people know you have diabetes.

Researchers found that women and men consumed the most white rice. five or more servings a week - had a 17 percent higher risk of diabetes than those who ate white rice less than once a month. People who ate the most brown rice - two or more servings a week - had a risk of diabetes less than 11 percent for those who ate brown rice infrequently. Researchers estimate that exchanging whole grain for white rice could reduce the risk of diabetes by 36 percent.

Some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin, sometimes in combination with oral medications. Insulin is also used in "Beta cell failure", a condition in which the pancreas no longer produces insulin in response to high glycemia. e. This can happen in people with type 2 diabetes. If insulin is not produced, insulin treatment is necessary. There are other non-insulinic drugs given as an injection that are used to treat type 2 diabetes.

In China, for example, where white rice is a staple, the Shanghai Women's Health Survey found women whose diets had the glycemic index. Highest risk had an increased risk of type 2 diabetes of 21%. the diets had the lowest glycemic index. 23 Similar results have been reported in the Black Women's Health Study. More recent studies from Nurses Health Studies I and II and the Health Professional Follow-up Study suggest that whole grain versus white rice could be reduce the risk of diabetes.

Zinc People with type 2 diabetes tend to be deficient in zinc, but there is some evidence that zinc supplementation does not improve their ability to process sugar. Nevertheless, many doctors recommend that people with type 2 diabetes supplement with moderate amounts of zinc 15 to 25 mg daily as a way of correcting the condition. Details deficit. More Prevention: The 100 Best Supplements for Women.

GTT is a blood test that is used to diagnose gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Watch as Dr. Ankush describes about this test, how it’s done, how much fasting needs to be done and what…

Updated: 2018-01-13 — 7:47 am

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