The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Cardinal Signs Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body's use of glucose a type of sugar you make from carbohydrates that you eat. Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their job. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose to enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here's the problem: People with type 2 diabetes also known as diabetes mellitus can not use or store glucose properly, either because their cells are resistant, or, in some cases, are not enough.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune cells attack insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes can not produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and affects 85 to 90% of all people with diabetes. Although it usually affects mature adults, the youngest are now diagnosed in greater numbers as rates of obesity and overweight increase.

We do not know what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is associated with modifiable risk factors to lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes also has strong genetic and family risk factors. Type 2 diabetes develops over a long period of time years. During this period, insulin resistance starts, that's when insulin is more and more ineffective in managing blood glucose levels.

No longer having type 2 diabetes as long as you do not gain weight means not only no compressions for diabetes and no complications, but also often the reversal of arterial hypertension rial. According to Dr. Louise McCombie and her colleagues, type 2 diabetes, generally perceived as progressive and incurable, now affects 5% to 10% of the population, or about 3.2 million people .

You can think of insulin as the key that opens the cells and allows glucose ie, sugar to enter your cells. If your body is resistant to insulin, then all that sugar can not enter your cells and it builds up in the blood, causing high blood sugar. Diabetes is extremely common. In the United States, there are more than 25 million people with type 2 diabetes and 79 million people with pre-diabetes.

If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you can delay or prevent development by changing your lifestyle. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice any symptoms. Symptoms may include blood tests that can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also test how you manage your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and glycaemia testing.

People usually develop type 2 diabetes after the age of 40, although people of South Asian origin are at increased risk of developing the disease and can develop a diabete from the age of 25 years. The condition is also becoming more common among children and adolescents of all populations. Type 2 diabetes often develops due to overweight, obesity and lack of physical activity, and the prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide as these conditions increase. problems are spreading.

The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may include Hyperglycemia, or hyperglycemia, is common in type 2 diabetes. Its signs and symptoms may be acute short duration or chronic last over a long period of time. What if I have type 2 diabetes and become pregnant? If you are diabetic and you are pregnant, you can have a normal and healthy pregnancy, but you must take extra measures to avoid overweight and glycaemia. raised.

This difficult disease, formerly known as adult diabetes, strikes an ever-increasing number of adults. Even more alarming, it begins to appear in adolescents and children. The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of celiac disease and renal failure in adults. It causes mild, severe nerve damage that, combined with circulatory problems to diabetes, often leads to he loses a leg or a foot.


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