The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Diabetes Cause Kidney Infection

Diabetes is a problem with your body that causes higher glucose levels in the blood sugar than normal. This is also called hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. In the beginning, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. Over time, he is not able to follow and can not produce enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal.

Although most people are shaken by a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, many people see the diagnosis in a more positive light, such as a wake-up call. It is often an incentive to become more active, eat healthier foods and manage body weight. It can also be an opportunity for you to make a positive difference to those around you, whether they are your friends or your immediate and larger family.

If the blood vessels that feed the brain are affected, this can lead to a stroke. Excess glucose in the blood can damage the small blood vessels in the nerves, causing a tingling sensation or pain in the fingers, toes, and limbs. Nerves outside the central nervous system can also be damaged, which is called peripheral neuropathy. If the nerves of the gastrointestinal tract are affected this can cause vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

Your doctor may suggest insulin injections if lifestyle changes and medications do not control your blood sugar. You will usually need to inject insulin once or twice daily, using a small needle or a pen-type syringe with replaceable cartridges. You can be prescribed several different types of insulin. Some work faster than others and act for different durations. Your doctor or nurse will tell you which type is best for you.

The ADA also notes that even metformin has shown itself less effective than lifestyle modification - lifestyle changes may slow or prevent type 2 diabetes in some people with genetic disposition. Now a type 2 diabetic, Argenta has changed his lifestyle. It has reduced sweet foods and increased its protein intake. He also exercises and takes metformin and some other medications. Argenta says that he feels much better now than he did before being diagnosed.

Some older names for type 2 diabetes include: "Adult Start Diabetes", "Sugar-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes" and "NIDDM". These old names should not be used because they are no longer considered correct. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type ofDiabate. Of all people with diabetes, 90% have type 2 diabetes. Some ethnic groups, such as the South African Indian population, are more likely to develop diabetes, and in these cases groups, the percentage is even higher.

More than half of Americans of Asian descent and nearly half of Hispanic Americans with diabetes are undiagnosed. Health care experts say it's not easy to get people to change their behavior. "Tell people to lose weight does not give them enough information, it's not a message that helps and supports them," Albright said. To teach people how to change and maintain a new set of lifestyle habits, the CDC is also promoting its national diabetes prevention program, initiated in 2010.

Living with diabetes is a challenge for everyone, but children and adolescents often have special problems to settle. Young children may not understand why blood tests and medications are needed. They might be scared, angry, and not cooperate. Teens may feel different from their peers and want a more spontaneous lifestyle than diabetes allows them. Even when they follow their treatment plan faithfully, they may feel frustrated if the natural changes in puberty make their diabetes more difficult to control.

As a result, the glucose stays in the blood instead of being displaced in the cells. In addition, glucose is not transferred to the liver for storage. In the early stages of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces larger amounts of insulin to try to overcome this resistance. This occurs as the condition progresses. Over time, the pancreas produces less and less insulin and, eventually, the pancreas will stop producing insulin.

About 5 to 10% of diagnosed diabetes cases are type 1 diabetes. The other form of diabetes tends to seep into people, taking years to become a real diabetes. It begins when the muscles and other cells stop responding to the signal of insulin opening by glucose. The body reacts by making more and more insulin, essentially trying to bring the sugar back into the cells. Eventually, the insulin-producing cells run out and begin to fail.

People with type 2 diabetes may lose their vision. In some severe cases, people with type 2 diabetes need to be amputated with one foot or one leg. The risk of these and other complications is why it is so important to keep your glycaemia under control. A healthy diet can help people with type 2 diabetes lose weight and manage their blood sugar. Although there is no single meal plan for controlling type 2 diabetes, just look at what you eat and how much you can eat.

How can Diabetes affect your Kidneys? How can Diabetes give rise to amputation? Professor Mandika Wijeyaratne, Consultant Transplant and Vascular Surgeon of Lanka Hospitals explains.

Updated: 2018-02-28 — 7:33 pm
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