The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Diabetes Test To Diagnose

If your blood sugar is 200 mg / dL 11.1 mmol / L or higher and you have symptoms of hyperglycaemia see "Symptoms" above , it is likely that you have diabetes. A fasting glycaemia test is a blood test done after eating or drinking for 8 to 12 hours usually during the night. A normal fasting blood glucose level is less than 100 mg / dL 5.55 mmol / L. - The "A1C" blood test measures your average blood glucose in the last two days The normal values ​​for A1C are 4 to 5.6%.

Hyperglycaemia observed in diabetes can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs, leading to a number of potential complications. Here are some examples of complications caused by diabetes: An elevated and persistent gland may increase the risk of narrowing and blocking blood vessels by fatty plaques atherosclerosis. pink. This can disrupt the blood flow to the heart causing angina pectoris and, in some cases, a heart attack.

Losing weight. The loss of only 7% to 10% of your weight can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by half. Be active. Moving muscles use insulin. Thirty minutes of brisk walking a day will reduce your risk by almost a third. Eat well. Avoid highly processed carbohydrates, sweetened beverages, and trans and saturated fats. Limit red and processed meats. Stop smoking. Work with your doctor to avoid gaining weight, so that you do not create a problem by solving another.

Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic disorder that occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or when insulin does not work properly, so-called insulin resistance. . Insulin is the hormone that stimulates cells to absorb glucose from the blood to be used for energy. When this is the case, insulin does not teach glucose to the cells, which means that blood sugar levels increase so-called hyperglycemia.

As the symptoms can develop gradually, you can get used to feeling thirsty and tired and you can not recognize that you are sick for a while. Some people also develop blurred vision and frequent infections, such as re-occurring lily of the valley. However, some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms if the glucose level is not too high. But, even if you do not have any symptoms, you should always take treatment to reduce the risk of developing complications.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune cells attack insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes can not produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and affects 85 to 90% of all people with diabetes. Although it usually affects mature adults, the youngest are now diagnosed in greater numbers as rates of obesity and overweight increase.

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose a type of sugar in the blood. The body uses glucose as the main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruits and milk. Once the food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. Glucose in the blood must enter the tissues of the body so that the cells can use it as a source of energy.

This can lead to a condition called hyperosmolar hyperglycemia. If this happens, you can become very dehydrated and lose consciousness. Although the risk of this disease is low, it is a medical emergency and you will have to be treated at the hospital. Your blood glucose level may become too weak hypoglycaemia if you do not eat enough carbohydrates when taking insulin or special medications called sulfonylureas eg, gliclazide.

For many but not all people, type 2 diabetes can be prevented by making healthy food choices and staying active. There is an obvious link between type 2 diabetes and hypertension hypertension and / or disordered levels of fats cholesterol in the blood the medical name is dyslipid. mie. This combination of diabetes with hypertension and dyslipidemia is sometimes referred to as "metabolic syndrome" or syndrome X.

Type 2 diabetes formerly known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes is different. Unlike a person with type 1 diabetes, a person with type 2 diabetes still produces insulin, but the body does not respond normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of providing energy this is called insulin resistance. This causes an increase in blood sugar, which causes the pancreas to produce even more insulin.

Learn more at: http://AnimatedDiabetesPatient.com Diabetes is diagnosed through laboratory blood tests: the fasting blood glucose test, hemoglobin A1c test, and the oral glucose tolerance…

Updated: 2018-02-04 — 7:31 pm
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