The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Diabetics Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body's use of glucose a type of sugar you make from carbohydrates that you eat. Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their job. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose to enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here's the problem: People with type 2 diabetes also known as diabetes mellitus can not use or store glucose properly, either because their cells are resistant, or, in some cases, are not enough.

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose a type of sugar in the blood. The body uses glucose as the main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruits and milk. Once the food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. Glucose in the blood must enter the tissues of the body so that the cells can use it as a source of energy.

If your blood sugar is 200 mg / dL 11.1 mmol / L or higher and you have symptoms of hyperglycaemia see "Symptoms" above , it is likely that you have diabetes. A fasting glycaemia test is a blood test done after eating or drinking for 8 to 12 hours usually during the night. A normal fasting blood glucose level is less than 100 mg / dL 5.55 mmol / L. - The "A1C" blood test measures your average blood glucose in the last two days The normal values ​​for A1C are 4 to 5.6%.

There is no cure for type 2 diabetes. But medications can help people normalize their blood sugar levels and it is crucial to take control of your blood sugar. to prevent or reduce complications. Without treatment, type 2 diabetes can wreak havoc, damaging the heart, blood vessels, nerves, kidneys, brain, eyes, feet, and skin. This increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. This can lead to kidney failure.

Recently, some companies have started replacing HFCS with beet sugar in some of their products, as more and more people are learning about HFCS and protesting this phenomenon, but one of them effects of this law is to create a negative loop. which perpetuates the standard American regime very profitable. The end result is a food culture that is the main driver of diabetes and disease, not a determinant of health!

Insulin resistance means that although the body can produce insulin, the body's cells do not respond properly to the insulin produced. Over time, the pancreas reduces the amount of insulin it produces. The hemoglobin A1c test measures the amount of glycosylated hemoglobin glucose-linked hemoglobin in your blood and provides information about your average blood sugar over the course of 2 to 3 months.

Type 1 Diabetes Versus Type 2 Diabetes - Physicians can usually tell if a person is type 1 or type 2, but there are situations where the diagnosis is difficult to diagnose. finish. In such cases, doctors often perform additional blood tests. A full discussion of the treatment of type 2 diabetes is available separately. Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Sugar: Treatment Beyond the Basics and Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Sugar: Insulin Treatment Beyond the Principles baseline and patient education: hypoglycaemia hypoglycaemia in diabetes mellitus Beyond the Basics.

Have diabetes?, 7 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy Several tests can be used to diagnose diabetes. A simple blood test known as hemoglobin A1C or glycerized hemoglobin test measures average blood glucose over the past three months. Why three months? Because glucose attaches to a protein called hemoglobin in red blood cells, and these cells are recycled and re-sourced about every three months. A rate normal A1C is less than 5.7%.

Learn what low blood sugar is, what causes it and what to do to treat it. Most of the time people with type 2 diabetes are told to keep their blood sugar from getting too high, but blood sugar…

Updated: 2018-01-12 — 6:38 pm
Website Disclaimer The medical information made available on Diabetes-Types.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. You should NOT rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your doctor or health care provider for any specific medical questions you have. | Copyright © 2005-2018 Diabetes Types Guide | All Rights Reserved Frontier Theme