The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Meals And Snacks For Diabetics

What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, adolescents and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy for life. Diabetes type 2 is much more common.

The main risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle - excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this trend. Alarming situation. People with pre-diabetes who do not change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and may develop type 2 diabetes. the lack of treatment, "said William T. Cefalu, scientific and medical director.

Glucose levels are so high because the body is unable to use it properly. In people diagnosed with diabetes, their pancreas does not produce insulin, or not enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is usually produced by the pancreas and allows glucose to enter the cells of the body, where it is used for energy. The symptoms are caused by high levels off glucose remaining in the blood, where it can not be used as energy.

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important. A combination of these factors can lead to insulin resistance, when your body does not use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genes play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are Also important. You may, for example, have a genetic mutation that can make you vulnerable to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes.

SGLT 2 inhibitors have recently been approved for the treatment of diabetes in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is currently unclear whether SGLT 2 inhibitors should be prescribed for people with high blood sugar who do not meet the criteria for type 2 diabetes. We wanted to know if these medications would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. Development of Type 2 Diabetes.

In type 2 diabetes, your body does not react properly to insulin and you may not produce enough. This causes a high level of glycaemia. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Diabetes type 2 is the most common form. About 3.3 million people in the United Kingdom have been diagnosed with diabetes, and of these, more than 9 out of 10 have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is more common among older people, but you can develop it at any age.

A slight hyperglycaemia usually causes no symptoms. But you may find that you are more thirsty than usual, urinate more often and feel tired as your blood glucose level continues to rise. If your blood sugar is not controlled properly and remains too high, it can cause a number of long-term problems. These include: Very rarely, if you have an infection or are dehydrated, your blood sugar can reach a dangerously high level.

Weight loss and exercise improve your body's sensitivity to insulin and reduce your blood sugar. Eating fewer carbohydrates in one sitting gives your body the opportunity to treat them before they have a chance to accumulate as glucose in your blood. If this initial treatment approach does not work, you are often prescribed hypoglycaemic medication. We do not know the precise cause of type 2 diabetes.

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Updated: 2018-02-23 — 11:42 am
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