The Diabetes Types Guide

How to Achieve Type 2 Diabetes Reversal with Lifestyle Change!

Signs And Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar For A Diabetes

This hormone tells the cells to sponge glucose. Without this, the glucose floats around the bloodstream, unable to slide inside the cells that need it. Diabetes occurs when the body can not produce enough insulin or can not properly use the insulin it produces. A form of diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks and ultimately defeats the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This is type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes.

If the blood vessels that feed the brain are affected, this can lead to a stroke. Excess glucose in the blood can damage the small blood vessels in the nerves, causing a tingling sensation or pain in the fingers, toes, and limbs. Nerves outside the central nervous system can also be damaged, which is called peripheral neuropathy. If the nerves of the gastrointestinal tract are affected this can cause vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, adolescents and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy for life. Diabetes type 2 is much more common.

In keeping with the trends of most medical specialties, diabetes management begins to focus on the reversible mechanisms of the disease rather than the treatment of symptoms. And subsequent multisystem pathological consequences. Genetic er disposition and aging play a role in uncommon type 2 diabetes mellitus. weight. Lower glycaemia or HbA1c concentrations remain the primary goal of management, as reflected in current clinical guidelines and the actions of licensed drugs.

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can be a scary and overwhelming experience, and you probably have questions about why it has developed, what it means for your long-term health, and how it will affect your daily life. For most people, the first months after diagnosis are filled with emotional ups and downs. If you have just been diagnosed with diabetes, you and your family should take advantage of this time to learn as much as possible to take care of your diabetes including testing your glycemia, going to appointments medical and take your medications.

Triglycerides wrinkles at levels higher than 250 mg / dLLow of cholesterol HDL less than 35 mg / dL Some risk factors for diabetes can not be controlled. Hispanics, Amerindians, Asians and Afro-Americans have a higher than average risk of contracting diabetes. Having a family history parent or brother with diabetes increases your risk. People over 45 are at a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than younger people.

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes may include: being overweight or obese, wearing excess fat around the abdomen, an inactive lifestyle, high blood triglycerides s a type of fat, low HDL cholesterol and / or high fasting glycaemia. Possible Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes: extreme hunger or hunger, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, unusual tiredness, blurred vision, irritability, numbness or tingling in the hands or feet, healed slow rison cuts and bruises, frequent skin, gum, or bladder infections.

If you suffer from this type of diabetes, the foods you eat should have a low glycemic load foods high in fiber, protein or fat such as vegetables and proteins. good quality like fish, chicken, beans and lentils. From this base, other types of nutritious foods such as fruits, whole grains, low fat dairy products and nuts should be added. Foods with a high glycemic index foods that increase glycaemia too fast are foods to avoid, such as foodssed foods, rich in carbohydrates, sugars, or animal fats.

Dr. Rhonda Todd, MD, internal medicine, is doing her part to educate the pre-diabet. Based near Ann Arbor, Michigan, she tries to test as many patients as she can for pre-diabetes if they fit a risk profile, using the A1C test. Most private insurers cover the costs of an A1C test, just like Medicaid and Medicare when the patient has risk factors. Todd said she never had a problem getting an approved test.

More information on staying well with diabetes and treatment can be found here. When diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, most people feel very anxious, sad and fearful. It's perfectly natural. Mixed with these feelings can also be a sense of relief. Why? Well, there is a sense of certainty that comes from discovering what was wrong when you have an undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, you may have been sick and tired for a while, but you do not know what the problem was.

A higher percentage reflects higher levels of glycaemia. Pre-diabetes is defined as a reading of 5.7 to 6.4, while diabetes is diagnosed when glucose levels reach 6.5% or more. A fasting glucose test measures glycaemia at a given time. Typically, this test is done at the first hour in the morning before breakfast, after at least eight hours of eating. Normal reading is less than 100 milligrams per deciliter mg / dl.

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose, the main type of sugar in the blood. Insulin acts as a key that opens the doors to cells and lets in glucose. Without insulin, glucose can not enter the cells the doors are "locked" and there is no key and remain in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of symptoms and health problems.

Top 10 Warning Signs of Low Blood Sugar – Part 1 1. Ravenous hunger 2. Feelings of anxiety 3. Restless nights 4. Shakes and tremors 5. Emotional instability …

Updated: 2018-05-23 — 4:40 pm
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